Uncategorized

Winter Weather/Social Media & Statement From the National Weather Service

November 23rd, 2014 at 1:03 am by under Uncategorized

As we get into winter beware of outrageous forecasts randomly posted online from unknown sources.  This creates a rumor train & hype that confuses a lot of people as I will see major forecasts of specific snowstorms with amounts a week or more out.  Model data is raw & not a forecast.  Just a few weeks ago, I saw where someone in Texas posted the potential of 6-10″ of snowfall in northern Texas because one model showed this briefly, which created a minor panic there & it never came to fruition.

Also, beware of the forecasts on your mobile device.  Unless it is from NWS or other credible mets, the source is unknown & may be totally off what the forecast should look like.  I have run into this several times when someone will ask me “we are getting a big snow tomorrow?” when it doesn’t look like much.  I then ask, “where did you get that information?”…..”my phone”.

I’m a realist, if it looks like it may get dicey, then we will forecast that & elaborate, but I dislike hype used in some media & in online weather outlets.  That data is spilled on-line & spreads like wildfire to lead some to believe a blizzard is coming or a big ice storm or what have you.

This is from the National Weather Service in Norman, Oklahoma:

1


November 17th, 2014 at 6:25 pm by under Uncategorized

NOVEMBER 17, 2013 TORNADO OUTBREAK (18 TORNADOES CONFIRMED IN THE VIEWING AREA)

A significant severe weather outbreak occurred November 17, 2013 with 18 confirmed tornadoes (17 EF0-EF2s & 1 low-end EF3), widespread damaging straight-line winds & a few isolated hailers (up to 0.50″ diameter).  Up to a total of 1.89″ fell in the viewing area.

18 were confirmed, including 2 very small tracks.  Although this will rank as the 3rd highest tornado count in a day since 1950 in Indiana, this is less & much less violent than several other outbreaks studied prior back to 1845.

As for the viewing area, the November 11, 1911 outbreak may have had as many EF0-EF1 tornadoes & the May 12, 1886 had over 20 tornadoes with most of them EF3-EF4.

Confirmed tornado counts can be confusing, as this outbreak was very heavily surveyed.  In 2009, I received video & a pics of an EF0 tornado near Burlington, but it was not confirmed.  In 2010, an EF0 tornado near Wolcott was caught on film, but was never confirmed by NWS.  In 2010, nice tornado signature produced a strip of damage to high-tension poles in Clinton County, but this was not surveyed, nor confirmed.  So, many tornadoes are missed & high numbers of tornadoes are usually confirmed for outbreaks & High Risk days as more time is spent in a survey.

Also, prior to 1950, many tornadoes were missed, except for EF2-EF5s.  So, this being third biggest ever for Indiana, is actually the third biggest outbreak since 1950.

Large outbreak, definitely, but the way outbreaks are surveyed & our lack of intense record-keeping throws numbers off as to what is truly the largest outbreak or second, or third largest outbreak ever in Indiana.

11181715141181151

14441613

Work continues on this………..it is not finished.

ADI Map II1516

These images are pulled from actual cut-ins on WLFI on Sunday, November 17, 2013.  This shows the tornadoes we were tracking during the event.

There is much more to do.  This is just a small bit that is finished.

TORNADO #1 & #2:  Tippecanoe County

South Raub & Northwest of Romney

1201

TORNADO #3:  White County

Southwest to Northwest of Chalmers

25A

2

TORNADO #4:  Fountain to Tippecanoe Counties

Veedersburg to Mellot to Near West Point

X46202

TORNADO #5: Southeast Benton to Southwest to White Counties

Southwest of Otterbein to Near Round Grove

1152151

TORNADO #6: Northern Montgomery County

Near Linden

109207

TORNADO #7:  Tippecanoe Through Carroll to Southwestern Cass County

South/Southeast Lafayette Near Petit to Near Pyrmont, Cutler to Carrollton to Near Young America

81111203

TORNADO #8:  Southeast Tippecanoe County (possibly even south of Mulberry, but this was never confirmed by NWS)

Near Stockwell to South of Mulberry

1214204

TORNADO #9 & #10:  Northeast Clinton to Howard Counties

Southwest of Forest to Kokomo & just north of main tornado track in Kokomo

HMN205

TORNADO #11:  Pulaski County

Near Medaryville to Denham

RG3

TORNADO #12:  Miami County

North & Northeast of Grissom Air Reserve Base

 

IKL9

TORNADO #13:  Southeast Newton-Southwest Jasper County

Goodland Area

213

TORNADO #14:  Northeast Jasper County

Northeast of Rensselaer

214

TORNADO #15:  Central Cass County

Southwest to Southeast of Logansport

216

TORNADO #16:  Southern Tipton (& Northern Hamilton) County

Around Atlanta

217

TORNADO #17 & #18:  Boone County

Southwest of Lebanon to Lebanon & Northeast of Lebanon

219

 

South/Southeast Lafayette EF3 (Greg Bower’s neighbor):

Northeast of Lebanon EF1 (by Josh Gimbel):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZNMXTIYWUQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMmPwNhIfKY

Lebanon EF2 (by Eric Knudson):

Northeast of Lebanon EF1 (by Steve Abston):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZNMXTIYWUQ

Northeast Jasper County EF1 (by Justin Bednar):

First Kokomo Tornado (EF2) (by Justin Longwith):


October 29, 1996 Severe Weather Outbreak

October 29th, 2014 at 10:24 pm by under Uncategorized

October 29, 1996 QLCS

A QLCS with small LEWPs within it passed through the WLFI viewing area 7:50-10 p.m. on October 29, 1996.  In the bulging appendages of the “S’s” or LEWPs, the winds were maximized.  The very strong low-level winds that caused those bulges in storm lines, often make it to the ground.

Widespread straight-line wind damage was reported countywide in Newton, Jasper, Pulaski, Fulton, Benton, White, Fountain & Tipton counties with damage in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Numerous trees, tree limbs, powerlines & power poles were downed by the winds & literally hundreds of farm buildings sustained damage area-wide.

A home’s roof was heavily damaged in Crawfordsville, trees fell atop a camper at Concord (Tippecanoe County), hundreds of trees were snapped or uprooted at Newtown.  Rensselaer, Monticello, Rochester, Crawfordsville, Russiaville, Lebanon & Windfall all reported significant damage to the communities” trees with numerous homes reporting roof damage.  Grain augers were overturned by the winds at Lebanon.

270


September 7th, 2014 at 11:24 pm by under Uncategorized

FEBRUARY 20, 2014 SEVERE EVENT

A QLCS squall line raced through largely our southern half on February 20 with damaging straight-line winds & one confirmed tornado.

Additionally, rapid snow melt from much warmer weather & rainfall caused flooding & significant ice jams on rivers & streams.

An ice jam on the Eel River in Cass County caused flooding with a few home evacuations.  Ice jam on Wildcat Creek has also caused back-up flooding, resulting in several home evacuations.

The Wabash had a 7-mile long ice jam in Carroll & Cass counties, backing up floodwater further in to Cass County.

Pipestone Creek on the Cass/Miami line had an ice jam with back-up flooding being reported.

Event images & NWS tornado survey (note: tornado is not on severe storm reports map, as it was confirmed after this map was made).

Tornado was a part of LEWP in the line with one signature southeast & east of Crawfordsville & another north of Crawfordsville.  The one southeast & east of Crawfordsville produced the tornado.

HSC

2521119

1192426

25

212023282131

32

Track is based on radar data & NWS information:

1514

FGIH

IHBADI Map II

M

13

STORM REPORTS:

Hillsboro:  Small limbs down & shingles off home

Crawfordsville:  M61 mph

Tipton:  E65 mph

Atlanta:  M67 mph

Frankfort:  Semi overturned, leaking propane.  I-65 closed.

Northeast of Frankfort:  5 minutes of gusts of 50-52 mph.

Frankfort:  M55 mph

Kokomo:  M54 mph

Attica:  M50 mph

Covington:  M52 mph

Thorntown:  M62 mph

Burlington:  M51 mph

Logansport:  M58 mph

Montgomery County:  Several reports of shingles blown off homes.

_______________________________________________________

MAY 21, 2014 SUPERCELLS WITH LARGE HAIL & MICROBURST

The second severe weather event of the year struck today with hail to baseball size & one significant microburst.

Overnight, supercell/multi-cells gelled into an MCS that clipper our north/northeast.  Marble hail & gusty winds were reported in the morning in Cass, Miami counties.

The outflow boundary from these storms set up in the heart of the viewing area.  With nice northwest flow at mid & upper levels along with a very unstable, hot, juicy environment, supercells & multi-cells popped rapidly.  The high CAPE & steep lapse rates with shear from the stronger flow aloft made for lots of hail & a few minor to significant microbursts.

Storms also popped on the actual surface cold front.  As another core of stronger mid- & upper-flow helped to ignite these storms.

Eventually the cold front merged with the outflow boundary in the evening & as that even stronger flow arrived we had billiard ball to baseball hail in southeast Fountain & southwest Montgomery counties this evening.  Hail of up to softball size fell in eastern Illinois.

Tree limbs were reportedly downed near Kingman & Covington with 50 & 53 mph gusts.  An intense microburst around Lebanon caused tree damage & even toppled many large trees (one 3′ in diameter at breast height).  Power poles & line were also down.  In this 1.5- to 2-mile oval, winds may have gusted 70 to perhaps 75 mph.

123

Images of the event:

357111023

Ryan Harber (West Lafayette):  Storm over Boone County as seen from West Lafayette…………..

John Mahoney (West of Frankfort on I-65):  Wall cloud on back side of supercell that produced 1.75″ hail & 50 mph gust in Clinton County……………..

Autumn McGregor (South of Pine Village):  Underbelly of severe storms over Vermillion & Parke counties this evening, showing the mammatus…………………….

Beth Mantle (Attica):  Underbelly of storm from Parke County showing mammatus……………………

Lyndsey Gayler (West Point):  Mammatus over West Point…………….

Ryan35789

Other pics:

542178

_______________________________________________________________________

JUNE 18, 2014 LINE OF STORMS

A line of storms with a relatively narrow swath of wind damage passed through the area in the afternoon.  These overturned the airmass & gutted a lot of the surface instability for storms.  These storms did struggle due to capping (CINH) issues nudging in from Plains/western Corn Belt upper ridge.

However, central Illinois missed the storms & was highly-unstable, hot & humid in the evening with surface CAPE to 4500 J/kg.  This advected back in & although it was more elevated instability at first, the storms & instability became increasingly surface-based with time.  That, in combination with good downdraft CAPE & lake breeze front & a slightly-bowing line of storms passed through in the evening in the “Ring of Fire” or periphery of Plains & western Corn Belt upper ridging, capping & heat.

STORM REPORTS:

East of Morocco:  Powerlines down

East of Morocco:  E70 mph

Lake Village:  E60 mph

Northern Newton County:  Powerlines down & on fire

North of West Lafayette:  E60 mph

WLFI-TV:  M55 mph

Lake Cicott:  Trees down

White County:  Multiple trees down countywide

Burlington:  M60 mph

Kokomo:  M64 mph

Delphi:  Trees down on Tecumseh Bend Road

Peru:  Tree down on power lines

Northeast of Thorntown:  M51 mph (Report Missing In First Image)

117DMA Map II

Images of the event:

18

311323533324241424551525755

Autumn McGregor:  Near Pine Village

2122

Pam Leonard:  Monticello

23

__________________________________________________________________________

JUNE 30-JULY 1, 2014: TWO DERECHOS

A long-lived, long-track derecho raked areas just north of the viewing area during the late evening of Tuesday, June 30.  This did prompt Severe T’Storm Warning for far northern Jasper County at 9 p.m., but wind stayed just north of the Kankakee River.

Second derecho races east & southeastward, affecting area 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. on a very sultry, juicy night.   WLFI dew point hit 78.  Morocco dew point hit 79!

Storms raced southeastward between though they encountered CINH (capping) with southward progression & began to weaken.

However, they did produce gusts of 45-55 mph, even with weakening.  As they completely collapsed, extensive wind damage occurred in our far southeast & east & then in the Indianapolis area.

Aided by upper trough & ridge-riding shortwave, storms exploded on plume of very high surface CAPE in Illinois & Indiana, which had been capped all afternoon.  Surface CAPE reached 4500-5500 J/kg, which lingered after dusk & supported the severe threat.

Less capping (CINH) & more dynamics, but bit less CAPE brought the most widespread damaging winds to our northern & northwestern counties.

3

200101

18212331353738394041424546484952535659636465

Winamac Damage (from Betty & Teri):

234578111314

NWS Chicago has confirmed one EF1 tornado occurred in the June 30-July 1 derecho in our viewing area.

Embedded in the significant damaging straight-line winds, it appears a tornado (perhaps multiple tornadoes) occurred in northern Jasper County east & northeast of Demotte in an 8-mile path.

Below is image of velocity data as tornado was northeast of Demotte before lifting.  At this point, it was still likely as EF1.  Velocity data still indicated 95 mph winds at beam level about 4.5 miles northeast of Demotte at this time.

A tornado was also confirmed near Lowell.  You can see the signature of it in the second image.

4241

Tornadoes were confirmed in Kankakee & Will counties in Illinois.  However, extreme straight-line winds to 100 mph hit Morris, Illinois.

3837

Pics of the tornado damage are courtesy of NWS Chicago:

1234

TORNADO # 5 IN AND NEAR DEMOTTE INDIANA...

RATING:                 EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    100-105 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  8.0 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   200 YARDS
FATALITIES:             NONE
INJURIES:               NONE

START DATE:             JUNE 30 2014
START TIME:             1049 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         3.3 MILES EAST OF DE MOTTE IN
START LAT/LON:          41.1909/-87.2613

END DATE:               JUNE 30 2014
END TIME:               1056 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           4.9 MILES NORTHEAST OF DE MOTTE IN
END LAT/LON:            41.2240/-87.1138

SURVEY SUMMARY:
A 100-200 YARD SWATH OF CONSISTENT TREE DAMAGE...WITH NUMEROUS
SNAPPED TREES...BEGAN EAST-SOUTHEAST OF DE MOTTE BETWEEN N CR 1150
W AND N CR 1100 W JUST NORTH OF W CR 1200 N. THE DAMAGE CONTINUED
EAST-NORTHEAST JUST TO THE EAST AND THEN THROUGH THE CENTER OF DE
MOTTE NORTH OF 9TH STREET. JUST EAST OF DE MOTTE ALONG ORCHID
STREET...A BARN WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED AND DOUBLE WIDE
MANUFACTURED HOME EXPERIENCED SOME STRUCTURAL AND/OR ROOF DAMAGE.
FURTHER NORTHEAST ALONG W CR 1450 N NEAR THE END OF THE DAMAGE
PATH...THERE WERE SNAPPED TREES...WOOD POWER POLES LEANING AND
DAMAGE TO TWO FARMSTEADS. ON ONE...THE DOORS COLLAPSED IN A POLE
BARN. IN ANOTHER POLE BARN...THE WALLS COLLAPSED AFTER THE ROOF
WAS BLOWN OFF. THE DAMAGE IN THIS TORNADO PATH WAS CONSISTENT WITH
MAXIMUM SPEEDS OF 100-105 MPH.

IT CANNOT BE CONCLUSIVELY RULED OUT THAT MORE THAN ONE TORNADO
TOUCHED DOWN ALONG THE 8 MILE LONG DAMAGE PATH.

NWS has confirmed that southeast of Lowell to northern Jasper County, straight-line winds of 85-110 mph occurred.

EF1 tornado with winds of 100-105 mph was embedded in the straight-line winds.

Wind damage in Pulaski County consistent with gusts of 60-85 mph.  The northern half of the county was hardest hit with damage similar to that of Marshall County, where winds were up to 85 mph

STORM REPORTS:

M86 mph  Lowell

E85 mph  Wheatfield

E80 mph Northside of Winamac

M70 mph  Morocco

Numerous Trees Down In the Northern Half of Pulaski County

Tree Limbs & Trees Down  Northwest Newton County

Barns & Farms Outbuildings Damaged/Destroyed Near Demotte

Numerous Trees & Powerlines Down In Demotte

Trees Down Near Grissom Air Reserve Base

2 Power Poles Snapped at the Base  Grissom Reserve Base

Trees & Power Lines Down Across Western Boone County

Several Farm Buildings Damaged/Destroyed in Western Boone County.

Power Poles Blown Onto 75 Near Advance

Large Tree Limb Blown Down Along 75 in Advance

M66 mph  Grissom Air Reserve Base

M64 mph  Winamac

Trees Down Near St. Joseph College

Extensive Wind Damage In Winamac:  Trees & Powerlines Down with Structural Damage

M61 mph  Kentland

Tree Limbs & TV Antennas Down In Kentland

E60 mph Ladoga

M59 mph  Fowler

E50 mph Between Attica & West Point

M48 mph  Attica

M45 mph  Rensselaer

M44 mph  Fulton County Airport

M43 mph  White County Airport

M41 mph  WLFI-TV

M40 mph  Northeast of Frankfort

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

JULY 14, 2014 SQUALL LINE

With arrival of upper trough & surface cold front, band of multi-cell storms with a couple with embedded supercell features, gelled into a squall line with sporadic strong-severe gusts & some pea hail.

Surface CAPE was a bit less (today 2500 J/kg) than it had been in a few days, but dynamics were stronger with up to 40 kts. of shear, good convergence to form storms & steeper lapse rates.

5258

Images of the event:

14123512341511121315182831323435373840

Josh Raub sent this pic of minor siding damage in Lindbergh Village in West Lafayette.  Two other homes lost shingles.

1

Other images of the storm/storm damage:

434241

______________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 21, 2014 CLUSTER TO LINE OF STORMS (WITH LARGE HAILER ON TAIL END)

A cluster of storms quickly developed on the evening of August 21 just northwest of the viewing area at the junction of MCV & outflow boundary from morning MCS, storm quickly blew up in uncapped, highly unstable environment with up to 4500 J/kg of surface CAPE downstream.

The cluster assumed a more linear, organized bow shape with southeastward progression as cold pool developed (rain-cooled air forcing the storms forward & fanning them out into the bowing line).  On its tail end, large hail fell, some of it up to full black walnut size (2.25″ diameter).  Also, a brief, tightly-wound rotation signature was seen.

Precipitable water amounts were very high with dew points in the middle to even upper 70s.  So, torrential rainfall accompanied the storms with a quick 2″ of rainfall in some areas, which resulted in flash flooding.

130DMA Map IIDMA Map IV

Images of the event as we were tracking the storms:

12121122123125130133135131138139140141142144145146147151154156158160161162167168169170171172174175180176178181

Damage, Hail & Sky Pics:

10110211822457120121123125127128

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 26-27, 2014 MACROBURSTS & LARGE HAIL

August 26

154151148

103105108111116110112114118119ABECEEAA132134135138157

August 27

135102101108110111114117120126127131116

August 26

218216

201202203205206208209210211213214220219

August 27

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


The Historic Early September 1953 Heat Wave

September 3rd, 2014 at 2:37 pm by under Uncategorized

 

 


4 P.M. Update

September 1st, 2014 at 4:09 pm by under Uncategorized

A few scattered showers/t’showers are passing through the viewing area now.

The actual surface cold front is just northwest & west of the viewing area.  Here, a band of towering, agitated cumulus is noted, so we will still watch for potential narrow squall line to form.  Isolated severe threat still seems reasonable.

With it paralelling the flow aloft, it may train some.

Also, a lot of t’storms will likely develop in Missouri to Illinois.  That mass of t’storms will tend to move east & northeastward tonight bringing showers & t’storms to the area.

Locally-heavy rainfall still seems to be a good call south of U.S. 24.

101


2014 Severe Weather Events

August 27th, 2014 at 3:27 pm by under Uncategorized

FEBRUARY 20, 2014 SEVERE EVENT

A QLCS squall line raced through largely our southern half on February 20 with damaging straight-line winds & one confirmed tornado.

Additionally, rapid snow melt from much warmer weather & rainfall caused flooding & significant ice jams on rivers & streams.

An ice jam on the Eel River in Cass County caused flooding with a few home evacuations.  Ice jam on Wildcat Creek has also caused back-up flooding, resulting in several home evacuations.

The Wabash had a 7-mile long ice jam in Carroll & Cass counties, backing up floodwater further in to Cass County.

Pipestone Creek on the Cass/Miami line had an ice jam with back-up flooding being reported.

Event images & NWS tornado survey (note: tornado is not on severe storm reports map, as it was confirmed after this map was made).

Tornado was a part of LEWP in the line with one signature southeast & east of Crawfordsville & another north of Crawfordsville.  The one southeast & east of Crawfordsville produced the tornado.

HSC

2521119

1192426

25

212023282131

32

Track is based on radar data & NWS information:

1514

FGIH

IHBADI Map II

M

13

STORM REPORTS:

Hillsboro:  Small limbs down & shingles off home

Crawfordsville:  M61 mph

Tipton:  E65 mph

Atlanta:  M67 mph

Frankfort:  Semi overturned, leaking propane.  I-65 closed.

Northeast of Frankfort:  5 minutes of gusts of 50-52 mph.

Frankfort:  M55 mph

Kokomo:  M54 mph

Attica:  M50 mph

Covington:  M52 mph

Thorntown:  M62 mph

Burlington:  M51 mph

Logansport:  M58 mph

Montgomery County:  Several reports of shingles blown off homes.

_______________________________________________________

MAY 21, 2014 SUPERCELLS WITH LARGE HAIL & MICROBURST

The second severe weather event of the year struck today with hail to baseball size & one significant microburst.

Overnight, supercell/multi-cells gelled into an MCS that clipper our north/northeast.  Marble hail & gusty winds were reported in the morning in Cass, Miami counties.

The outflow boundary from these storms set up in the heart of the viewing area.  With nice northwest flow at mid & upper levels along with a very unstable, hot, juicy environment, supercells & multi-cells popped rapidly.  The high CAPE & steep lapse rates with shear from the stronger flow aloft made for lots of hail & a few minor to significant microbursts.

Storms also popped on the actual surface cold front.  As another core of stronger mid- & upper-flow helped to ignite these storms.

Eventually the cold front merged with the outflow boundary in the evening & as that even stronger flow arrived we had billiard ball to baseball hail in southeast Fountain & southwest Montgomery counties this evening.  Hail of up to softball size fell in eastern Illinois.

Tree limbs were reportedly downed near Kingman & Covington with 50 & 53 mph gusts.  An intense microburst around Lebanon caused tree damage & even toppled many large trees (one 3′ in diameter at breast height).  Power poles & line were also down.  In this 1.5- to 2-mile oval, winds may have gusted 70 to perhaps 75 mph.

123

Images of the event:

357111023

Ryan Harber (West Lafayette):  Storm over Boone County as seen from West Lafayette…………..

John Mahoney (West of Frankfort on I-65):  Wall cloud on back side of supercell that produced 1.75″ hail & 50 mph gust in Clinton County……………..

Autumn McGregor (South of Pine Village):  Underbelly of severe storms over Vermillion & Parke counties this evening, showing the mammatus…………………….

Beth Mantle (Attica):  Underbelly of storm from Parke County showing mammatus……………………

Lyndsey Gayler (West Point):  Mammatus over West Point…………….

Ryan35789

Other pics:

542178

_______________________________________________________________________

JUNE 18, 2014 LINE OF STORMS

A line of storms with a relatively narrow swath of wind damage passed through the area in the afternoon.  These overturned the airmass & gutted a lot of the surface instability for storms.  These storms did struggle due to capping (CINH) issues nudging in from Plains/western Corn Belt upper ridge.

However, central Illinois missed the storms & was highly-unstable, hot & humid in the evening with surface CAPE to 4500 J/kg.  This advected back in & although it was more elevated instability at first, the storms & instability became increasingly surface-based with time.  That, in combination with good downdraft CAPE & lake breeze front & a slightly-bowing line of storms passed through in the evening in the “Ring of Fire” or periphery of Plains & western Corn Belt upper ridging, capping & heat.

STORM REPORTS:

East of Morocco:  Powerlines down

East of Morocco:  E70 mph

Lake Village:  E60 mph

Northern Newton County:  Powerlines down & on fire

North of West Lafayette:  E60 mph

WLFI-TV:  M55 mph

Lake Cicott:  Trees down

White County:  Multiple trees down countywide

Burlington:  M60 mph

Kokomo:  M64 mph

Delphi:  Trees down on Tecumseh Bend Road

Peru:  Tree down on power lines

Northeast of Thorntown:  M51 mph (Report Missing In First Image)

117DMA Map II

Images of the event:

18

311323533324241424551525755

Autumn McGregor:  Near Pine Village

2122

Pam Leonard:  Monticello

23

__________________________________________________________________________

JUNE 30-JULY 1, 2014: TWO DERECHOS

A long-lived, long-track derecho raked areas just north of the viewing area during the late evening of Tuesday, June 30.  This did prompt Severe T’Storm Warning for far northern Jasper County at 9 p.m., but wind stayed just north of the Kankakee River.

Second derecho races east & southeastward, affecting area 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. on a very sultry, juicy night.   WLFI dew point hit 78.  Morocco dew point hit 79!

Storms raced southeastward between though they encountered CINH (capping) with southward progression & began to weaken.

However, they did produce gusts of 45-55 mph, even with weakening.  As they completely collapsed, extensive wind damage occurred in our far southeast & east & then in the Indianapolis area.

Aided by upper trough & ridge-riding shortwave, storms exploded on plume of very high surface CAPE in Illinois & Indiana, which had been capped all afternoon.  Surface CAPE reached 4500-5500 J/kg, which lingered after dusk & supported the severe threat.

Less capping (CINH) & more dynamics, but bit less CAPE brought the most widespread damaging winds to our northern & northwestern counties.

3

200101

18212331353738394041424546484952535659636465

Winamac Damage (from Betty & Teri):

234578111314

NWS Chicago has confirmed one EF1 tornado occurred in the June 30-July 1 derecho in our viewing area.

Embedded in the significant damaging straight-line winds, it appears a tornado (perhaps multiple tornadoes) occurred in northern Jasper County east & northeast of Demotte in an 8-mile path.

Below is image of velocity data as tornado was northeast of Demotte before lifting.  At this point, it was still likely as EF1.  Velocity data still indicated 95 mph winds at beam level about 4.5 miles northeast of Demotte at this time.

A tornado was also confirmed near Lowell.  You can see the signature of it in the second image.

4241

Tornadoes were confirmed in Kankakee & Will counties in Illinois.  However, extreme straight-line winds to 100 mph hit Morris, Illinois.

3837

Pics of the tornado damage are courtesy of NWS Chicago:

1234

TORNADO # 5 IN AND NEAR DEMOTTE INDIANA...

RATING:                 EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    100-105 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  8.0 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   200 YARDS
FATALITIES:             NONE
INJURIES:               NONE

START DATE:             JUNE 30 2014
START TIME:             1049 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         3.3 MILES EAST OF DE MOTTE IN
START LAT/LON:          41.1909/-87.2613

END DATE:               JUNE 30 2014
END TIME:               1056 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           4.9 MILES NORTHEAST OF DE MOTTE IN
END LAT/LON:            41.2240/-87.1138

SURVEY SUMMARY:
A 100-200 YARD SWATH OF CONSISTENT TREE DAMAGE...WITH NUMEROUS
SNAPPED TREES...BEGAN EAST-SOUTHEAST OF DE MOTTE BETWEEN N CR 1150
W AND N CR 1100 W JUST NORTH OF W CR 1200 N. THE DAMAGE CONTINUED
EAST-NORTHEAST JUST TO THE EAST AND THEN THROUGH THE CENTER OF DE
MOTTE NORTH OF 9TH STREET. JUST EAST OF DE MOTTE ALONG ORCHID
STREET...A BARN WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED AND DOUBLE WIDE
MANUFACTURED HOME EXPERIENCED SOME STRUCTURAL AND/OR ROOF DAMAGE.
FURTHER NORTHEAST ALONG W CR 1450 N NEAR THE END OF THE DAMAGE
PATH...THERE WERE SNAPPED TREES...WOOD POWER POLES LEANING AND
DAMAGE TO TWO FARMSTEADS. ON ONE...THE DOORS COLLAPSED IN A POLE
BARN. IN ANOTHER POLE BARN...THE WALLS COLLAPSED AFTER THE ROOF
WAS BLOWN OFF. THE DAMAGE IN THIS TORNADO PATH WAS CONSISTENT WITH
MAXIMUM SPEEDS OF 100-105 MPH.

IT CANNOT BE CONCLUSIVELY RULED OUT THAT MORE THAN ONE TORNADO
TOUCHED DOWN ALONG THE 8 MILE LONG DAMAGE PATH.

NWS has confirmed that southeast of Lowell to northern Jasper County, straight-line winds of 85-110 mph occurred.

EF1 tornado with winds of 100-105 mph was embedded in the straight-line winds.

Wind damage in Pulaski County consistent with gusts of 60-85 mph.  The northern half of the county was hardest hit with damage similar to that of Marshall County, where winds were up to 85 mph

STORM REPORTS:

M86 mph  Lowell

E85 mph  Wheatfield

E80 mph Northside of Winamac

M70 mph  Morocco

Numerous Trees Down In the Northern Half of Pulaski County

Tree Limbs & Trees Down  Northwest Newton County

Barns & Farms Outbuildings Damaged/Destroyed Near Demotte

Numerous Trees & Powerlines Down In Demotte

Trees Down Near Grissom Air Reserve Base

2 Power Poles Snapped at the Base  Grissom Reserve Base

Trees & Power Lines Down Across Western Boone County

Several Farm Buildings Damaged/Destroyed in Western Boone County.

Power Poles Blown Onto 75 Near Advance

Large Tree Limb Blown Down Along 75 in Advance

M66 mph  Grissom Air Reserve Base

M64 mph  Winamac

Trees Down Near St. Joseph College

Extensive Wind Damage In Winamac:  Trees & Powerlines Down with Structural Damage

M61 mph  Kentland

Tree Limbs & TV Antennas Down In Kentland

E60 mph Ladoga

M59 mph  Fowler

E50 mph Between Attica & West Point

M48 mph  Attica

M45 mph  Rensselaer

M44 mph  Fulton County Airport

M43 mph  White County Airport

M41 mph  WLFI-TV

M40 mph  Northeast of Frankfort

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

JULY 14, 2014 SQUALL LINE

With arrival of upper trough & surface cold front, band of multi-cell storms with a couple with embedded supercell features, gelled into a squall line with sporadic strong-severe gusts & some pea hail.

Surface CAPE was a bit less (today 2500 J/kg) than it had been in a few days, but dynamics were stronger with up to 40 kts. of shear, good convergence to form storms & steeper lapse rates.

5258

Images of the event:

14123512341511121315182831323435373840

Josh Raub sent this pic of minor siding damage in Lindbergh Village in West Lafayette.  Two other homes lost shingles.

1

Other images of the storm/storm damage:

434241

______________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 21, 2014 CLUSTER TO LINE OF STORMS (WITH LARGE HAILER ON TAIL END)

A cluster of storms quickly developed on the evening of August 21 just northwest of the viewing area at the junction of MCV & outflow boundary from morning MCS, storm quickly blew up in uncapped, highly unstable environment with up to 4500 J/kg of surface CAPE downstream.

The cluster assumed a more linear, organized bow shape with southeastward progression as cold pool developed (rain-cooled air forcing the storms forward & fanning them out into the bowing line).  On its tail end, large hail fell, some of it up to full black walnut size (2.25″ diameter).  Also, a brief, tightly-wound rotation signature was seen.

Precipitable water amounts were very high with dew points in the middle to even upper 70s.  So, torrential rainfall accompanied the storms with a quick 2″ of rainfall in some areas, which resulted in flash flooding.

130DMA Map IIDMA Map IV

Images of the event as we were tracking the storms:

12121122123125130133135131138139140141142144145146147151154156158160161162167168169170171172174175180176178181

Damage, Hail & Sky Pics:

10110211822457120121123125127128

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 25-26, 2014 MACROBURSTS & LARGE HAIL

Pulsey multi-cells blew up in very unstable, hot, humid airmass on August 25 & 26.  At least two macrobursts were produced.  One on the eastside of Lafayette produced estimated wind gust to 65 mph, accompanied by 1-2″ diameter hail.  Trees, limbs & power lines were felled & large hail driven by the wind dented cars & damaged some homes. 

On August 25 the core of the wind damage & large hail was the east/northeast side of Lafayette.  Damage on August 26 occurred in similar areas, east/northeast side of Lafayette, but also south of Monticello.

On both days, limbs were downed in Kentland.

Storms were produced along weak surface frontal boundary with surface CAPE of up to 4000 J/kg with steep lapse rates.  However, the environment lacked decent shear or dynamics, so storms were CAPE-driven in that they pulsed up, belched out their wind & hail & collapsed.

154151148

103105108111116110112114118119ABECEEAA132134135138157

August 26

135102101108110111114117120126127131116

218216105107109108119121126127

201202203205206208209210211213214220219113115122


NWS: 3 Tornadoes Confirmed at & Southwest of Indianapolis From June 24

June 27th, 2014 at 2:24 pm by under Uncategorized

*NEW*

“Two additional tornado paths were found in NWS Surveys Friday, both from the same storm that produced the Plainfield-Indianapolis EF1 Tornado. 

The first tornado from this thunderstorm touched down at approximately 130 PM EDT, 5.4 miles northwest of the town of Gosport along Truesdel Road, just east of McFarren Road, in Owen County. This tornado was rated EF0 with winds estimated at 85 mph uprooting trees and causing minor damage to several buildings. This tornado lifted at 131 PM EDT after traveling one half mile.

The second tornado touched down at approximately 150 PM EDT, 1.5 miles southeast of the town of Eminence along County Road 500N, just east of the Craver Road / SR42 bend in Morgan County.   This tornado was rated EF1 with peak winds estimated at 94 mph that uprooted numerous trees and destroyed one barn.  This second tornado lifted at 151 PM EDT after traveling approximately one quarter mile.

A NWS survey Thursday revealed the Plainfield-Indianapolis tornado path being slightly longer than the original estimate. The path length was extended approximately 1/2 mile. Time on ground extended by two minutes. Damage information remains generally the same. Path images, KMZ and KML files updated to reflect new path information.

A weak tornado of EF1 intensity and winds estimated from 90 to 100 mph caused damage along an approximate three-mile path in Plainfield and Indianapolis Tuesday afternoon June 24th.  The tornado touched down near Perry Road and US40 in Plainfield at approximately 2:32 PM EDT.  The first significant damage occurred at a vehicle auction facility with one building heavily damaged and over 200 cars impacted by flying debris. Minor straight-line wind tree damage was observed west of the auction facility near Township Line Road and Smith Road.  The tornado traveled northeast causing damage to nearly two dozen homes in Hendricks County with the most severe damage along County Road 200S near County Road 1050E.  At this location the tornado lofted a camping trailer into the air and tossed it approximately 175 feet to the east onto a house and also removed a substantial portion of that houses roof.  This damage was rated EF1 with winds estimated at 95 to 100 mph.

The tornado continued tracking northeast through the Bentwood subdivision in east Hendricks County and into the Cameron Meadows subdivision of Indianapolis. The most significant damage in Indianapolis was along Raceway Road near Blue Pine Drive where a couple homes had portions of their roofs removed by the tornado. This damage was rated EF1 with winds estimated near 97 mph.  The tornado lifted at approximately 2:42 PM EDT northeast of  this subdivision though intermittent straight-line wind damage to trees occurred from here to near Rockville Road and I-465 all the way to the town of Speedway.

Indianapolis officials estimated 75 to 100 homes received at least minor damage in Indianapolis. Also, including the automobiles damaged at the auto auction center, more than 200 vehicles sustained varying degrees of damage.”


May 19th, 2014 at 1:59 pm by under Uncategorized

Blue-headed Vireo:

Ovenbird:

Cerulean Warbler:

Tennessee Warbler:

Warbling Vireo:

 

 

 


May 6th, 2014 at 10:15 am by under Uncategorized

Common Yellowthroat

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Eastern Towhee

Swamp Sparrow

Gray Catbird