Uncategorized

September 7th, 2014 at 11:24 pm by under Uncategorized

FEBRUARY 20, 2014 SEVERE EVENT

A QLCS squall line raced through largely our southern half on February 20 with damaging straight-line winds & one confirmed tornado.

Additionally, rapid snow melt from much warmer weather & rainfall caused flooding & significant ice jams on rivers & streams.

An ice jam on the Eel River in Cass County caused flooding with a few home evacuations.  Ice jam on Wildcat Creek has also caused back-up flooding, resulting in several home evacuations.

The Wabash had a 7-mile long ice jam in Carroll & Cass counties, backing up floodwater further in to Cass County.

Pipestone Creek on the Cass/Miami line had an ice jam with back-up flooding being reported.

Event images & NWS tornado survey (note: tornado is not on severe storm reports map, as it was confirmed after this map was made).

Tornado was a part of LEWP in the line with one signature southeast & east of Crawfordsville & another north of Crawfordsville.  The one southeast & east of Crawfordsville produced the tornado.

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Track is based on radar data & NWS information:

1514

FGIH

IHBADI Map II

M

13

STORM REPORTS:

Hillsboro:  Small limbs down & shingles off home

Crawfordsville:  M61 mph

Tipton:  E65 mph

Atlanta:  M67 mph

Frankfort:  Semi overturned, leaking propane.  I-65 closed.

Northeast of Frankfort:  5 minutes of gusts of 50-52 mph.

Frankfort:  M55 mph

Kokomo:  M54 mph

Attica:  M50 mph

Covington:  M52 mph

Thorntown:  M62 mph

Burlington:  M51 mph

Logansport:  M58 mph

Montgomery County:  Several reports of shingles blown off homes.

_______________________________________________________

MAY 21, 2014 SUPERCELLS WITH LARGE HAIL & MICROBURST

The second severe weather event of the year struck today with hail to baseball size & one significant microburst.

Overnight, supercell/multi-cells gelled into an MCS that clipper our north/northeast.  Marble hail & gusty winds were reported in the morning in Cass, Miami counties.

The outflow boundary from these storms set up in the heart of the viewing area.  With nice northwest flow at mid & upper levels along with a very unstable, hot, juicy environment, supercells & multi-cells popped rapidly.  The high CAPE & steep lapse rates with shear from the stronger flow aloft made for lots of hail & a few minor to significant microbursts.

Storms also popped on the actual surface cold front.  As another core of stronger mid- & upper-flow helped to ignite these storms.

Eventually the cold front merged with the outflow boundary in the evening & as that even stronger flow arrived we had billiard ball to baseball hail in southeast Fountain & southwest Montgomery counties this evening.  Hail of up to softball size fell in eastern Illinois.

Tree limbs were reportedly downed near Kingman & Covington with 50 & 53 mph gusts.  An intense microburst around Lebanon caused tree damage & even toppled many large trees (one 3′ in diameter at breast height).  Power poles & line were also down.  In this 1.5- to 2-mile oval, winds may have gusted 70 to perhaps 75 mph.

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Images of the event:

357111023

Ryan Harber (West Lafayette):  Storm over Boone County as seen from West Lafayette…………..

John Mahoney (West of Frankfort on I-65):  Wall cloud on back side of supercell that produced 1.75″ hail & 50 mph gust in Clinton County……………..

Autumn McGregor (South of Pine Village):  Underbelly of severe storms over Vermillion & Parke counties this evening, showing the mammatus…………………….

Beth Mantle (Attica):  Underbelly of storm from Parke County showing mammatus……………………

Lyndsey Gayler (West Point):  Mammatus over West Point…………….

Ryan35789

Other pics:

542178

_______________________________________________________________________

JUNE 18, 2014 LINE OF STORMS

A line of storms with a relatively narrow swath of wind damage passed through the area in the afternoon.  These overturned the airmass & gutted a lot of the surface instability for storms.  These storms did struggle due to capping (CINH) issues nudging in from Plains/western Corn Belt upper ridge.

However, central Illinois missed the storms & was highly-unstable, hot & humid in the evening with surface CAPE to 4500 J/kg.  This advected back in & although it was more elevated instability at first, the storms & instability became increasingly surface-based with time.  That, in combination with good downdraft CAPE & lake breeze front & a slightly-bowing line of storms passed through in the evening in the “Ring of Fire” or periphery of Plains & western Corn Belt upper ridging, capping & heat.

STORM REPORTS:

East of Morocco:  Powerlines down

East of Morocco:  E70 mph

Lake Village:  E60 mph

Northern Newton County:  Powerlines down & on fire

North of West Lafayette:  E60 mph

WLFI-TV:  M55 mph

Lake Cicott:  Trees down

White County:  Multiple trees down countywide

Burlington:  M60 mph

Kokomo:  M64 mph

Delphi:  Trees down on Tecumseh Bend Road

Peru:  Tree down on power lines

Northeast of Thorntown:  M51 mph (Report Missing In First Image)

117DMA Map II

Images of the event:

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Autumn McGregor:  Near Pine Village

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Pam Leonard:  Monticello

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__________________________________________________________________________

JUNE 30-JULY 1, 2014: TWO DERECHOS

A long-lived, long-track derecho raked areas just north of the viewing area during the late evening of Tuesday, June 30.  This did prompt Severe T’Storm Warning for far northern Jasper County at 9 p.m., but wind stayed just north of the Kankakee River.

Second derecho races east & southeastward, affecting area 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. on a very sultry, juicy night.   WLFI dew point hit 78.  Morocco dew point hit 79!

Storms raced southeastward between though they encountered CINH (capping) with southward progression & began to weaken.

However, they did produce gusts of 45-55 mph, even with weakening.  As they completely collapsed, extensive wind damage occurred in our far southeast & east & then in the Indianapolis area.

Aided by upper trough & ridge-riding shortwave, storms exploded on plume of very high surface CAPE in Illinois & Indiana, which had been capped all afternoon.  Surface CAPE reached 4500-5500 J/kg, which lingered after dusk & supported the severe threat.

Less capping (CINH) & more dynamics, but bit less CAPE brought the most widespread damaging winds to our northern & northwestern counties.

3

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Winamac Damage (from Betty & Teri):

234578111314

NWS Chicago has confirmed one EF1 tornado occurred in the June 30-July 1 derecho in our viewing area.

Embedded in the significant damaging straight-line winds, it appears a tornado (perhaps multiple tornadoes) occurred in northern Jasper County east & northeast of Demotte in an 8-mile path.

Below is image of velocity data as tornado was northeast of Demotte before lifting.  At this point, it was still likely as EF1.  Velocity data still indicated 95 mph winds at beam level about 4.5 miles northeast of Demotte at this time.

A tornado was also confirmed near Lowell.  You can see the signature of it in the second image.

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Tornadoes were confirmed in Kankakee & Will counties in Illinois.  However, extreme straight-line winds to 100 mph hit Morris, Illinois.

3837

Pics of the tornado damage are courtesy of NWS Chicago:

1234

TORNADO # 5 IN AND NEAR DEMOTTE INDIANA...

RATING:                 EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    100-105 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  8.0 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   200 YARDS
FATALITIES:             NONE
INJURIES:               NONE

START DATE:             JUNE 30 2014
START TIME:             1049 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         3.3 MILES EAST OF DE MOTTE IN
START LAT/LON:          41.1909/-87.2613

END DATE:               JUNE 30 2014
END TIME:               1056 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           4.9 MILES NORTHEAST OF DE MOTTE IN
END LAT/LON:            41.2240/-87.1138

SURVEY SUMMARY:
A 100-200 YARD SWATH OF CONSISTENT TREE DAMAGE...WITH NUMEROUS
SNAPPED TREES...BEGAN EAST-SOUTHEAST OF DE MOTTE BETWEEN N CR 1150
W AND N CR 1100 W JUST NORTH OF W CR 1200 N. THE DAMAGE CONTINUED
EAST-NORTHEAST JUST TO THE EAST AND THEN THROUGH THE CENTER OF DE
MOTTE NORTH OF 9TH STREET. JUST EAST OF DE MOTTE ALONG ORCHID
STREET...A BARN WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED AND DOUBLE WIDE
MANUFACTURED HOME EXPERIENCED SOME STRUCTURAL AND/OR ROOF DAMAGE.
FURTHER NORTHEAST ALONG W CR 1450 N NEAR THE END OF THE DAMAGE
PATH...THERE WERE SNAPPED TREES...WOOD POWER POLES LEANING AND
DAMAGE TO TWO FARMSTEADS. ON ONE...THE DOORS COLLAPSED IN A POLE
BARN. IN ANOTHER POLE BARN...THE WALLS COLLAPSED AFTER THE ROOF
WAS BLOWN OFF. THE DAMAGE IN THIS TORNADO PATH WAS CONSISTENT WITH
MAXIMUM SPEEDS OF 100-105 MPH.

IT CANNOT BE CONCLUSIVELY RULED OUT THAT MORE THAN ONE TORNADO
TOUCHED DOWN ALONG THE 8 MILE LONG DAMAGE PATH.

NWS has confirmed that southeast of Lowell to northern Jasper County, straight-line winds of 85-110 mph occurred.

EF1 tornado with winds of 100-105 mph was embedded in the straight-line winds.

Wind damage in Pulaski County consistent with gusts of 60-85 mph.  The northern half of the county was hardest hit with damage similar to that of Marshall County, where winds were up to 85 mph

STORM REPORTS:

M86 mph  Lowell

E85 mph  Wheatfield

E80 mph Northside of Winamac

M70 mph  Morocco

Numerous Trees Down In the Northern Half of Pulaski County

Tree Limbs & Trees Down  Northwest Newton County

Barns & Farms Outbuildings Damaged/Destroyed Near Demotte

Numerous Trees & Powerlines Down In Demotte

Trees Down Near Grissom Air Reserve Base

2 Power Poles Snapped at the Base  Grissom Reserve Base

Trees & Power Lines Down Across Western Boone County

Several Farm Buildings Damaged/Destroyed in Western Boone County.

Power Poles Blown Onto 75 Near Advance

Large Tree Limb Blown Down Along 75 in Advance

M66 mph  Grissom Air Reserve Base

M64 mph  Winamac

Trees Down Near St. Joseph College

Extensive Wind Damage In Winamac:  Trees & Powerlines Down with Structural Damage

M61 mph  Kentland

Tree Limbs & TV Antennas Down In Kentland

E60 mph Ladoga

M59 mph  Fowler

E50 mph Between Attica & West Point

M48 mph  Attica

M45 mph  Rensselaer

M44 mph  Fulton County Airport

M43 mph  White County Airport

M41 mph  WLFI-TV

M40 mph  Northeast of Frankfort

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

JULY 14, 2014 SQUALL LINE

With arrival of upper trough & surface cold front, band of multi-cell storms with a couple with embedded supercell features, gelled into a squall line with sporadic strong-severe gusts & some pea hail.

Surface CAPE was a bit less (today 2500 J/kg) than it had been in a few days, but dynamics were stronger with up to 40 kts. of shear, good convergence to form storms & steeper lapse rates.

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Images of the event:

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Josh Raub sent this pic of minor siding damage in Lindbergh Village in West Lafayette.  Two other homes lost shingles.

1

Other images of the storm/storm damage:

434241

______________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 21, 2014 CLUSTER TO LINE OF STORMS (WITH LARGE HAILER ON TAIL END)

A cluster of storms quickly developed on the evening of August 21 just northwest of the viewing area at the junction of MCV & outflow boundary from morning MCS, storm quickly blew up in uncapped, highly unstable environment with up to 4500 J/kg of surface CAPE downstream.

The cluster assumed a more linear, organized bow shape with southeastward progression as cold pool developed (rain-cooled air forcing the storms forward & fanning them out into the bowing line).  On its tail end, large hail fell, some of it up to full black walnut size (2.25″ diameter).  Also, a brief, tightly-wound rotation signature was seen.

Precipitable water amounts were very high with dew points in the middle to even upper 70s.  So, torrential rainfall accompanied the storms with a quick 2″ of rainfall in some areas, which resulted in flash flooding.

130DMA Map IIDMA Map IV

Images of the event as we were tracking the storms:

12121122123125130133135131138139140141142144145146147151154156158160161162167168169170171172174175180176178181

Damage, Hail & Sky Pics:

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_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 26-27, 2014 MACROBURSTS & LARGE HAIL

August 26

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August 27

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August 26

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August 27

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


The Historic Early September 1953 Heat Wave

September 3rd, 2014 at 2:37 pm by under Uncategorized

 

 


4 P.M. Update

September 1st, 2014 at 4:09 pm by under Uncategorized

A few scattered showers/t’showers are passing through the viewing area now.

The actual surface cold front is just northwest & west of the viewing area.  Here, a band of towering, agitated cumulus is noted, so we will still watch for potential narrow squall line to form.  Isolated severe threat still seems reasonable.

With it paralelling the flow aloft, it may train some.

Also, a lot of t’storms will likely develop in Missouri to Illinois.  That mass of t’storms will tend to move east & northeastward tonight bringing showers & t’storms to the area.

Locally-heavy rainfall still seems to be a good call south of U.S. 24.

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2014 Severe Weather Events

August 27th, 2014 at 3:27 pm by under Uncategorized

FEBRUARY 20, 2014 SEVERE EVENT

A QLCS squall line raced through largely our southern half on February 20 with damaging straight-line winds & one confirmed tornado.

Additionally, rapid snow melt from much warmer weather & rainfall caused flooding & significant ice jams on rivers & streams.

An ice jam on the Eel River in Cass County caused flooding with a few home evacuations.  Ice jam on Wildcat Creek has also caused back-up flooding, resulting in several home evacuations.

The Wabash had a 7-mile long ice jam in Carroll & Cass counties, backing up floodwater further in to Cass County.

Pipestone Creek on the Cass/Miami line had an ice jam with back-up flooding being reported.

Event images & NWS tornado survey (note: tornado is not on severe storm reports map, as it was confirmed after this map was made).

Tornado was a part of LEWP in the line with one signature southeast & east of Crawfordsville & another north of Crawfordsville.  The one southeast & east of Crawfordsville produced the tornado.

HSC

2521119

1192426

25

212023282131

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Track is based on radar data & NWS information:

1514

FGIH

IHBADI Map II

M

13

STORM REPORTS:

Hillsboro:  Small limbs down & shingles off home

Crawfordsville:  M61 mph

Tipton:  E65 mph

Atlanta:  M67 mph

Frankfort:  Semi overturned, leaking propane.  I-65 closed.

Northeast of Frankfort:  5 minutes of gusts of 50-52 mph.

Frankfort:  M55 mph

Kokomo:  M54 mph

Attica:  M50 mph

Covington:  M52 mph

Thorntown:  M62 mph

Burlington:  M51 mph

Logansport:  M58 mph

Montgomery County:  Several reports of shingles blown off homes.

_______________________________________________________

MAY 21, 2014 SUPERCELLS WITH LARGE HAIL & MICROBURST

The second severe weather event of the year struck today with hail to baseball size & one significant microburst.

Overnight, supercell/multi-cells gelled into an MCS that clipper our north/northeast.  Marble hail & gusty winds were reported in the morning in Cass, Miami counties.

The outflow boundary from these storms set up in the heart of the viewing area.  With nice northwest flow at mid & upper levels along with a very unstable, hot, juicy environment, supercells & multi-cells popped rapidly.  The high CAPE & steep lapse rates with shear from the stronger flow aloft made for lots of hail & a few minor to significant microbursts.

Storms also popped on the actual surface cold front.  As another core of stronger mid- & upper-flow helped to ignite these storms.

Eventually the cold front merged with the outflow boundary in the evening & as that even stronger flow arrived we had billiard ball to baseball hail in southeast Fountain & southwest Montgomery counties this evening.  Hail of up to softball size fell in eastern Illinois.

Tree limbs were reportedly downed near Kingman & Covington with 50 & 53 mph gusts.  An intense microburst around Lebanon caused tree damage & even toppled many large trees (one 3′ in diameter at breast height).  Power poles & line were also down.  In this 1.5- to 2-mile oval, winds may have gusted 70 to perhaps 75 mph.

123

Images of the event:

357111023

Ryan Harber (West Lafayette):  Storm over Boone County as seen from West Lafayette…………..

John Mahoney (West of Frankfort on I-65):  Wall cloud on back side of supercell that produced 1.75″ hail & 50 mph gust in Clinton County……………..

Autumn McGregor (South of Pine Village):  Underbelly of severe storms over Vermillion & Parke counties this evening, showing the mammatus…………………….

Beth Mantle (Attica):  Underbelly of storm from Parke County showing mammatus……………………

Lyndsey Gayler (West Point):  Mammatus over West Point…………….

Ryan35789

Other pics:

542178

_______________________________________________________________________

JUNE 18, 2014 LINE OF STORMS

A line of storms with a relatively narrow swath of wind damage passed through the area in the afternoon.  These overturned the airmass & gutted a lot of the surface instability for storms.  These storms did struggle due to capping (CINH) issues nudging in from Plains/western Corn Belt upper ridge.

However, central Illinois missed the storms & was highly-unstable, hot & humid in the evening with surface CAPE to 4500 J/kg.  This advected back in & although it was more elevated instability at first, the storms & instability became increasingly surface-based with time.  That, in combination with good downdraft CAPE & lake breeze front & a slightly-bowing line of storms passed through in the evening in the “Ring of Fire” or periphery of Plains & western Corn Belt upper ridging, capping & heat.

STORM REPORTS:

East of Morocco:  Powerlines down

East of Morocco:  E70 mph

Lake Village:  E60 mph

Northern Newton County:  Powerlines down & on fire

North of West Lafayette:  E60 mph

WLFI-TV:  M55 mph

Lake Cicott:  Trees down

White County:  Multiple trees down countywide

Burlington:  M60 mph

Kokomo:  M64 mph

Delphi:  Trees down on Tecumseh Bend Road

Peru:  Tree down on power lines

Northeast of Thorntown:  M51 mph (Report Missing In First Image)

117DMA Map II

Images of the event:

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311323533324241424551525755

Autumn McGregor:  Near Pine Village

2122

Pam Leonard:  Monticello

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__________________________________________________________________________

JUNE 30-JULY 1, 2014: TWO DERECHOS

A long-lived, long-track derecho raked areas just north of the viewing area during the late evening of Tuesday, June 30.  This did prompt Severe T’Storm Warning for far northern Jasper County at 9 p.m., but wind stayed just north of the Kankakee River.

Second derecho races east & southeastward, affecting area 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. on a very sultry, juicy night.   WLFI dew point hit 78.  Morocco dew point hit 79!

Storms raced southeastward between though they encountered CINH (capping) with southward progression & began to weaken.

However, they did produce gusts of 45-55 mph, even with weakening.  As they completely collapsed, extensive wind damage occurred in our far southeast & east & then in the Indianapolis area.

Aided by upper trough & ridge-riding shortwave, storms exploded on plume of very high surface CAPE in Illinois & Indiana, which had been capped all afternoon.  Surface CAPE reached 4500-5500 J/kg, which lingered after dusk & supported the severe threat.

Less capping (CINH) & more dynamics, but bit less CAPE brought the most widespread damaging winds to our northern & northwestern counties.

3

200101

18212331353738394041424546484952535659636465

Winamac Damage (from Betty & Teri):

234578111314

NWS Chicago has confirmed one EF1 tornado occurred in the June 30-July 1 derecho in our viewing area.

Embedded in the significant damaging straight-line winds, it appears a tornado (perhaps multiple tornadoes) occurred in northern Jasper County east & northeast of Demotte in an 8-mile path.

Below is image of velocity data as tornado was northeast of Demotte before lifting.  At this point, it was still likely as EF1.  Velocity data still indicated 95 mph winds at beam level about 4.5 miles northeast of Demotte at this time.

A tornado was also confirmed near Lowell.  You can see the signature of it in the second image.

4241

Tornadoes were confirmed in Kankakee & Will counties in Illinois.  However, extreme straight-line winds to 100 mph hit Morris, Illinois.

3837

Pics of the tornado damage are courtesy of NWS Chicago:

1234

TORNADO # 5 IN AND NEAR DEMOTTE INDIANA...

RATING:                 EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND:    100-105 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:  8.0 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:   200 YARDS
FATALITIES:             NONE
INJURIES:               NONE

START DATE:             JUNE 30 2014
START TIME:             1049 PM CDT
START LOCATION:         3.3 MILES EAST OF DE MOTTE IN
START LAT/LON:          41.1909/-87.2613

END DATE:               JUNE 30 2014
END TIME:               1056 PM CDT
END LOCATION:           4.9 MILES NORTHEAST OF DE MOTTE IN
END LAT/LON:            41.2240/-87.1138

SURVEY SUMMARY:
A 100-200 YARD SWATH OF CONSISTENT TREE DAMAGE...WITH NUMEROUS
SNAPPED TREES...BEGAN EAST-SOUTHEAST OF DE MOTTE BETWEEN N CR 1150
W AND N CR 1100 W JUST NORTH OF W CR 1200 N. THE DAMAGE CONTINUED
EAST-NORTHEAST JUST TO THE EAST AND THEN THROUGH THE CENTER OF DE
MOTTE NORTH OF 9TH STREET. JUST EAST OF DE MOTTE ALONG ORCHID
STREET...A BARN WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED AND DOUBLE WIDE
MANUFACTURED HOME EXPERIENCED SOME STRUCTURAL AND/OR ROOF DAMAGE.
FURTHER NORTHEAST ALONG W CR 1450 N NEAR THE END OF THE DAMAGE
PATH...THERE WERE SNAPPED TREES...WOOD POWER POLES LEANING AND
DAMAGE TO TWO FARMSTEADS. ON ONE...THE DOORS COLLAPSED IN A POLE
BARN. IN ANOTHER POLE BARN...THE WALLS COLLAPSED AFTER THE ROOF
WAS BLOWN OFF. THE DAMAGE IN THIS TORNADO PATH WAS CONSISTENT WITH
MAXIMUM SPEEDS OF 100-105 MPH.

IT CANNOT BE CONCLUSIVELY RULED OUT THAT MORE THAN ONE TORNADO
TOUCHED DOWN ALONG THE 8 MILE LONG DAMAGE PATH.

NWS has confirmed that southeast of Lowell to northern Jasper County, straight-line winds of 85-110 mph occurred.

EF1 tornado with winds of 100-105 mph was embedded in the straight-line winds.

Wind damage in Pulaski County consistent with gusts of 60-85 mph.  The northern half of the county was hardest hit with damage similar to that of Marshall County, where winds were up to 85 mph

STORM REPORTS:

M86 mph  Lowell

E85 mph  Wheatfield

E80 mph Northside of Winamac

M70 mph  Morocco

Numerous Trees Down In the Northern Half of Pulaski County

Tree Limbs & Trees Down  Northwest Newton County

Barns & Farms Outbuildings Damaged/Destroyed Near Demotte

Numerous Trees & Powerlines Down In Demotte

Trees Down Near Grissom Air Reserve Base

2 Power Poles Snapped at the Base  Grissom Reserve Base

Trees & Power Lines Down Across Western Boone County

Several Farm Buildings Damaged/Destroyed in Western Boone County.

Power Poles Blown Onto 75 Near Advance

Large Tree Limb Blown Down Along 75 in Advance

M66 mph  Grissom Air Reserve Base

M64 mph  Winamac

Trees Down Near St. Joseph College

Extensive Wind Damage In Winamac:  Trees & Powerlines Down with Structural Damage

M61 mph  Kentland

Tree Limbs & TV Antennas Down In Kentland

E60 mph Ladoga

M59 mph  Fowler

E50 mph Between Attica & West Point

M48 mph  Attica

M45 mph  Rensselaer

M44 mph  Fulton County Airport

M43 mph  White County Airport

M41 mph  WLFI-TV

M40 mph  Northeast of Frankfort

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

JULY 14, 2014 SQUALL LINE

With arrival of upper trough & surface cold front, band of multi-cell storms with a couple with embedded supercell features, gelled into a squall line with sporadic strong-severe gusts & some pea hail.

Surface CAPE was a bit less (today 2500 J/kg) than it had been in a few days, but dynamics were stronger with up to 40 kts. of shear, good convergence to form storms & steeper lapse rates.

5258

Images of the event:

14123512341511121315182831323435373840

Josh Raub sent this pic of minor siding damage in Lindbergh Village in West Lafayette.  Two other homes lost shingles.

1

Other images of the storm/storm damage:

434241

______________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 21, 2014 CLUSTER TO LINE OF STORMS (WITH LARGE HAILER ON TAIL END)

A cluster of storms quickly developed on the evening of August 21 just northwest of the viewing area at the junction of MCV & outflow boundary from morning MCS, storm quickly blew up in uncapped, highly unstable environment with up to 4500 J/kg of surface CAPE downstream.

The cluster assumed a more linear, organized bow shape with southeastward progression as cold pool developed (rain-cooled air forcing the storms forward & fanning them out into the bowing line).  On its tail end, large hail fell, some of it up to full black walnut size (2.25″ diameter).  Also, a brief, tightly-wound rotation signature was seen.

Precipitable water amounts were very high with dew points in the middle to even upper 70s.  So, torrential rainfall accompanied the storms with a quick 2″ of rainfall in some areas, which resulted in flash flooding.

130DMA Map IIDMA Map IV

Images of the event as we were tracking the storms:

12121122123125130133135131138139140141142144145146147151154156158160161162167168169170171172174175180176178181

Damage, Hail & Sky Pics:

10110211822457120121123125127128

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

AUGUST 25-26, 2014 MACROBURSTS & LARGE HAIL

Pulsey multi-cells blew up in very unstable, hot, humid airmass on August 25 & 26.  At least two macrobursts were produced.  One on the eastside of Lafayette produced estimated wind gust to 65 mph, accompanied by 1-2″ diameter hail.  Trees, limbs & power lines were felled & large hail driven by the wind dented cars & damaged some homes. 

On August 25 the core of the wind damage & large hail was the east/northeast side of Lafayette.  Damage on August 26 occurred in similar areas, east/northeast side of Lafayette, but also south of Monticello.

On both days, limbs were downed in Kentland.

Storms were produced along weak surface frontal boundary with surface CAPE of up to 4000 J/kg with steep lapse rates.  However, the environment lacked decent shear or dynamics, so storms were CAPE-driven in that they pulsed up, belched out their wind & hail & collapsed.

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August 26

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NWS: 3 Tornadoes Confirmed at & Southwest of Indianapolis From June 24

June 27th, 2014 at 2:24 pm by under Uncategorized

*NEW*

“Two additional tornado paths were found in NWS Surveys Friday, both from the same storm that produced the Plainfield-Indianapolis EF1 Tornado. 

The first tornado from this thunderstorm touched down at approximately 130 PM EDT, 5.4 miles northwest of the town of Gosport along Truesdel Road, just east of McFarren Road, in Owen County. This tornado was rated EF0 with winds estimated at 85 mph uprooting trees and causing minor damage to several buildings. This tornado lifted at 131 PM EDT after traveling one half mile.

The second tornado touched down at approximately 150 PM EDT, 1.5 miles southeast of the town of Eminence along County Road 500N, just east of the Craver Road / SR42 bend in Morgan County.   This tornado was rated EF1 with peak winds estimated at 94 mph that uprooted numerous trees and destroyed one barn.  This second tornado lifted at 151 PM EDT after traveling approximately one quarter mile.

A NWS survey Thursday revealed the Plainfield-Indianapolis tornado path being slightly longer than the original estimate. The path length was extended approximately 1/2 mile. Time on ground extended by two minutes. Damage information remains generally the same. Path images, KMZ and KML files updated to reflect new path information.

A weak tornado of EF1 intensity and winds estimated from 90 to 100 mph caused damage along an approximate three-mile path in Plainfield and Indianapolis Tuesday afternoon June 24th.  The tornado touched down near Perry Road and US40 in Plainfield at approximately 2:32 PM EDT.  The first significant damage occurred at a vehicle auction facility with one building heavily damaged and over 200 cars impacted by flying debris. Minor straight-line wind tree damage was observed west of the auction facility near Township Line Road and Smith Road.  The tornado traveled northeast causing damage to nearly two dozen homes in Hendricks County with the most severe damage along County Road 200S near County Road 1050E.  At this location the tornado lofted a camping trailer into the air and tossed it approximately 175 feet to the east onto a house and also removed a substantial portion of that houses roof.  This damage was rated EF1 with winds estimated at 95 to 100 mph.

The tornado continued tracking northeast through the Bentwood subdivision in east Hendricks County and into the Cameron Meadows subdivision of Indianapolis. The most significant damage in Indianapolis was along Raceway Road near Blue Pine Drive where a couple homes had portions of their roofs removed by the tornado. This damage was rated EF1 with winds estimated near 97 mph.  The tornado lifted at approximately 2:42 PM EDT northeast of  this subdivision though intermittent straight-line wind damage to trees occurred from here to near Rockville Road and I-465 all the way to the town of Speedway.

Indianapolis officials estimated 75 to 100 homes received at least minor damage in Indianapolis. Also, including the automobiles damaged at the auto auction center, more than 200 vehicles sustained varying degrees of damage.”


May 19th, 2014 at 1:59 pm by under Uncategorized

Blue-headed Vireo:

Ovenbird:

Cerulean Warbler:

Tennessee Warbler:

Warbling Vireo:

 

 

 


May 6th, 2014 at 10:15 am by under Uncategorized

Common Yellowthroat

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Eastern Towhee

Swamp Sparrow

Gray Catbird


10:21 A.M. Update

May 1st, 2014 at 10:21 am by under Uncategorized

It is a chilly 47 as of 10:21 a.m. with a west-southwest wind at 18 mph.

Some scattered showers are moving into our northwestern counties at the moment.

Other scattered showers are approaching our west & additional showers will likely pop with daily heating in Illinois & head our way.

That said, today will be a rather gray, cool, windy day with scattered showers.

Our highs will reach just 53 to 56.

1


A Look Back at the Severe Weather Oubreak of April 7, 1948

April 7th, 2014 at 6:20 pm by under Uncategorized

Late March through early April 1948 was incredibly active in the Midwest with tornado outbreaks & multiple episodes of violent weather.  April 7 was the third significant Midwest & viewing area severe weather outbreak since March 20.

On April 7, 1948, a tornado tracked from near Rob Roy to Odell, a total of 10 miles.  4 people were injured with numerous buildings damaged or destroyed in the two communities & in-between.  A trooper explained that it looked like “a lazy column of smoke rising from the center of the field.”

A violent tornado of F4 strength took a 40-mile path through Kankakee County, Illinois, Lake, Jasper & eventually Porter counties.  4 people were killed with one killed when their farmhouse was destroyed near Hebron.  20 people were injured.

An F3 occurred just northwest of this storm, while an F2 tore a 30-mile path from Cook County, Illinois to LaPorte County, Indiana.

Damaging straight-line winds & hail also accompanied the storms as they moved through our viewing area.

67 people were killed total on this day in Illinois & Indiana from the storms.

The next day (on April 8) an F2 200-yard wide tornado spawned by the same system killed 1 person & injured 4 others near Lexington, Kentucky.

According to National Weather Service Louisville: “A ‘bounding-type’ tornado destroyed barns and stables at the Keeneland Race Track.  A groom was killed.

From Lowell Tribune:

TWO KILLED, MANY INJURED BY WORST CYCLONE HERE IN 35 YEARS

MUCH DAMAGE DONE TO FARM HOMES AS RESULT OF TERRIFIC GALE

One of the worst cyclones ever recorded in this region, tore through the southern part of the county at about 6 p.m. yesterday, just missing Lowell, causing thousands of dollars worth of damage to farm homes and other buildings.

Fred Engelking, of Sollitt, Ill., was reported killed when his home was destroyed, and John Bricker, who lived in a small house along the Kankakee, just west of August Johnson’s on highway 53, was also killed in the same manner.

Charles Amey of Shelby and Theo. Matusek, west of Lowell, were in the most serious condition of the several local people receiving injuries. Amey, riding in a car on the Range Lone road, suffered head and back injuries when the car was blown out into a field. Matusek, who was badly hurt when his home was scattered by the gale, was also taken to a Gary hospital in a serious condition.

Walter Meyers, of Goodland, who had been to the Fred Homfeld farm east of town, suffered the same fate as Amey when his car was also tossed off the road, seriously injuring him.

Among those only slightly hurt were the four Burger children south of Lowell, who were bruised and scratched by debris when their home was struck.

Roaring in from across the Illinois state line, the twister completely wrecked the west Harold Mussman farm, and tore down everything but the home on their other farm; every building on the Neil Spry farm, just west of U.S. 41, was completely swept away and at the junction of 2 and 41 west of town, the Ike Schreiber garage building was badly damaged. The north wall of the cement block building was blown in and the roof torn off. A truckload of farm machinery in the building was badly smashed by falling blocks. At Fisher’s service station a few blocks south, two new house trailers were tossed several hundred feet away and smashed, but no other damage of any consequence was caused there.

The twister continued slightly southeast damaging every building in its path. The brick house on the Purdy farm, occupied by the Kenneth Burgers, was partially wrecked and turned on its foundation; the John Harper farm home and all other buildings were wrecked and blown away, as were the buildings on the Matt Theis farm and the old Maxwell place. Hundreds of trees in the path of the cyclone were sheared off and strewn over the highways and some roads were blocked by remains of farm houses and barns. Most of the area hit has had neither phone nor electric service since the storm and several days will be required to repair the damage to installations.

Other places damaged are:

Barn and shed on Mrs. Lovisa (Love) Jones’ farm occupied by Neil Love.

House and barn down on former M.A. Brannon farm, owned by Chicago parties.

Barn roof on the Don Skinner farm.

Barn on Joe Abraham farm, house damaged.

Barns on Joe Shone farm occupied by the Carl Turners, Jasper Surprise farm, occupied by the Lester Phillips, and the Nolan farm.

Porch and shed on the Boyd Wason farm.

Machine shed on the Emil Harding farm.

Barn and shed on Charles Dickinson farm, occupied by Harold Lappie.

Barn roof and shed on Cass Scritchfield farm.

Although Lowell was by-passed, it did suffer some damage from a severe hail storm a short time before the cyclone was reported, causing many broken windows and other damage. The hail, over an inch in diameter, created a thunderous roar for about 15 minutes as it beat on roofs of houses, cars and streets.

Eye witnesses to the disaster are still recounting tales of the freak storm, but it will be several days before an estimate can be made of total damage.

Of the several accidents reported yesterday, two were a direct result of the cyclone. Two sheriff’s deputies, returning to Crown Point after a checkup of the region hit by the storm, collided with a car driven by two Cedar Lake boys, about a mile north of town. One of the boys was seriously hurt and rushed to a hospital but none of the other three involved were injured. The other smashup occurred on Grant St., in Gary, a car colliding with the Sheets ambulance which was taking Mr. Matusek to the hospital.

Another article appeared on page 2, column 1, of the same issue of the paper:

RED CROSS TO GIVE TORNADO RELIEF HERE

    The Southern Lake County Chapter of the American Red Cross has initiated steps today (Thursday) for the organization of an advisory board to meet the immediate needs of individuals and families affected by yesterday’s tornado. Principal awards will be made for the following purposes: food,

clothing, and other maintenances; building and repairing homes, barns and the like; household goods, meeting medical and nursing expenses, farm supplies, livestock and equipment. Any family or individual who has suffered a disaster loss and needs assistance because of this loss may telephone Harry Clark, chairman, phone Lowell 5541 or headquarters at the Lowell National Bank, Lowell 4261.

The following April 15, 1948, Lowell Tribune article was found on page 1, column 1:

VISITORS SWARM INTO STORM AREAS SUNDAY

DEBRIS IS BEING CLEANED UP. DAMAGE IS ESTIMATED AT FULLY $1,000,000

A steady stream of traffic flowed through southern Lake county and eastern Illinois, with curiosity seeker viewing the ruins of the many farm homes following last Wednesday night’s baby tornadoes.

Lowell and Hebron areas had thousands of visitors, who never before had seen the devastation of a tornado in this region. The last storm that anywhere near equaled the one of last week, was nearly 40 years ago, when the storm came in from the west, wrecking the places now occupied by the Edw. Frahms and Myron Keeneys, then hitting the places now owned by John McGinley and Charles Carroll at the north edge of Lowell. At that time many chimneys were down and windows were broken, but no other damage was done in Lowell from the storm.

 

Neighbors of those hit by the storm, as well as many others, have pitched in and helped their unfortunate friends. The big job of cleaning up the wreckage of homes, barns, tool sheds, granaries, garages, and other buildings will continued until the work is completed. Many persons have nothing but kindling piles on the sites where their homes were located before the storm

The damage, while not possible to estimate fully in this area, is expected to run into nearly one million dollars, but farmers are happy that the losses to live stock was very low but poultry losses are expected to run into high figures.

Losses that have been reported to us, that we missed last week, are at the Echterling farm, occupied by Ray Ferris, and family, southeast of town, where the house was moved 50 feet from the foundation, while Ferris, his wife and two children lay flat on the ground in the yard. Other narrow escapes are reported. At the Matt Theis farm, Mr. and Mrs. Theis and three children went to the basement, and were huddled in one corner when the house was hit by the wind. Luckily they were in the corner least damaged and all came out, no one knows how, unhurt. The Harold Mussmans, Neil Sprys, John Harpers and Harold Lappies saw the storm was headed their way and left for safer places. At the Kenneth Burger home, the parents were in town, and while the house was wrecked their children came through the storm safely except for a few bruises.

At the Mrs. Eleanor Little farm, east of the Range Line, the damage is also heavy, three machine sheds, hog house, windmill, silo, two chicken houses, being storm casualties, as well as a one-fourth mile strip through the timber near the farm home.

Sheriff’s deputies have been paroling the storm areas to stop any looters that might take it upon themselves to take things that did not belong to them.

All power service has again been restored to the area and phone service is being restored by workmen as fast as the work can be done.

Another article on page 1, columns 3-4 of the same issue of the paper follows:

RED CROSS REHABILITATION IS NOW UNDERWAY IN LOWELL AREA

    Red Cross rehabilitation assistance is underway in the tornado swept area of Southern Lake County. Initial Red Cross surveys indicate that seven families suffered complete loss of all buildings, stock and machinery, and six families with an average approximate 50 per cent loss. Numerous other buildings, stock, and implements on other properties were also destroyed or damaged.

An over-all survey of the relief operations in the affected area, shows that the local chapter has met and is meeting the disaster situation in an excellent manner. Immediate attention has been given for food, clothing, and temporary shelter.

The Red Cross deeply appreciates the work and cooperation of many volunteers, the many farmer neighbors who helped clean up the rubbish and debris. The Lowell American Legion, Lowell Lions club, and the Indian Trail Grange, Numerous other organizations have also volunteered their services for sewing and the collection of clothing.

In the conduct of field operations, the Red Cross has set up headquarters at the Lowell National Bank, and is working with a strong local advisory committee, representing all interest in the affected area. This committee consists of H. Boyd Wason, and Leon L. Bailey of West Creek township, John Miller and Harry Clark, chairmen of Cedar Creek township, Thomas Fisher and Winfred Bryant of Eagle Creek township, with Wilbur Heidbreder as chairman of the local chapter also sitting in. The local advisory committee interprets the community to the Red Cross, and the Red Cross to the community, thereby bringing about mutual understanding. “It serves as a case committee to give advice to the field unit in carrying out Red Cross policies to the best advantage of the disaster sufferer and the community,” Mr. Heidbreder, local chapter chairman said.

Mr. Heidbreder states also: “Any family or individual affected by the disaster who are unable through their own efforts to meet their disaster-caused needs, will find the Red Cross willing to help them. The disaster-caused need of a family, rather than its loss, is the basis upon which assistance is given a person who has lost heavily in the disaster, but who[ever] is able to stand the loss financially, without unreasonable hardship, should not ask for disaster relief. The relief funds have been contributed by the American people, not to take the place of insurance, and to replace losses, but to meet actual needs. They are used only to meet minimum needs which the sufferers themselves can not meet, from their own resources — cash, credit, insurance, and earnings.”