October, 2012

Clipper Saturday with Some Showers (But Only 35% Coverage & Amounts Look Light)

October 31st, 2012 at 10:16 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

THURSDAY-SUNDAY……..

Thursday looks partly cloudy with stratocumulus/cumulus & west winds to 25 mph.  Friday, after a frosty, calmer morning low near 28, will be mostly sunny with northwest winds to 20 mph.

Alberta Clipper will arrive Saturday with more clouds & some scattered showers (35%), but amounts look pretty light.  Highs will run near 56.  A couple showers may linger into Saturday night &/or early Sunday.

Sunday looks to be an improving day with partly to mostly cloudy skies & highs near 55.

The deeper moisture of the subtropical jet will remain south of our area this weekend, so that clipper within the polar jet or northern branch of the jet, won’t have a lot of moisture to work with.

MONDAY-FRIDAY……

Next week looks dry right now, rather breezy with normal to above-normal temperatures.  After near 55 Monday & 58 Tuesday, 60 Wednesday, gusty clipper to our north Thursday may bring 60s in here.  It looks to turn cooler to end the week as that afformentioned clipper digs a bit of troughiness in here.  Highs right now look to be at 50-55 with brisk winds.

NEXT FRIDAY-NOVEMBER 12………

Right now it looks very dry up to November 12 with a very pronounced, sharp warm-up possible as we close in on November 12.  In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised to see some 70s if current pattern holds.  There are indications of a POWERHOUSE storm developing to our northwest with severe outbreak in the Plains & blizzard conditions in the Dakotas.

NOVEMBER 13-16……..

Powerhouse storm may roar up through northern Minnesota with wave of rain/storms here.  Given present data, it looks as if severe threat will remain just to our west, but we will watch this whole thing.  This looks to be followed at 40-45.


Halloween Weather at West Lafayette Tonight……….Back to 1887

October 31st, 2012 at 2:15 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

FORECAST FOR HALLOWEEN 2012:

HALLOWEEN CLIMATE INFO FOR WEST LAFAYETTE………1887-1900 Purdue University……1901-Present Purdue Agronomy Farm

HIGHEST HALLOWEEN TEMPERATURE:  83° in 1950 (second warmest 79° in 1933 & 1935)

LOWEST HALLOWEEN TEMPERATURE:  21° in 1908

LEAST TEMPERATURE MOVEMENT FROM HIGH & LOW FOR THE DAY:  1929 – High 65°    Low 62° (0.07″ rainfall that day)

HIGHEST AVERAGE TEMPERATURE:  70° in 1900 (High 77°    Low 63° [0.12" rainfall that day])

Second highest 68.5° in 1953 (High 83°    Low 54°)

HIGHEST LOW TEMPERATURE:  63° in 1900

LOWEST HIGH TEMPERATURE: 38° in 1954

LOWEST AVERAGE TEMPERATURE:  32.5° in 1906 (High 42°    Low 23°) & 1954 (High 38°    Low 27°)

GREATEST TEMP SPREAD FOR THE DAY:  37° in 1938 (High 68°    Low 31°)

MOST SNOW ON THE GROUND AT OBSERVATION TIME:  1″  1917

MOST SNOWFALL ON HALLOWEEN: 0.5″ 1917

WETTEST:  1919 – 1.63″


October 1804 Snowicane Similar In Respects to Sandy Superstorm

October 31st, 2012 at 1:33 am by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

The Great October 8-14, 1804 Superstorm Nor’easter or “Snowicane”…….

This brings back thoughts of the great 1804 Snowicane in the Northeast.  A large, strong hurricane moved north, interacted with another storm system & cold air & brought pretty much a hurricane of snow.  It appears to have been a major hurricane that skimmed by North Carolina & Virginia, then move northeastward & undergoing an evolution towards a tremendous Nor’easter.

The Old North Church in Boston lost its steeple & hundreds of ships were wrecked with structural damage widespread all over the Northeast from Philadelphia to Maine.  Up to 36″ of snow fell in the mountains of Massachusetts, New York & New Hampshire, while 3-5″ of rainfall fell near the coast.  Up to 48″ of snow fell in Vermont with forests in Maine reported heavily damaged by wind.  Up to 14″ of snow fell around Worcester, Massachusetts.

The “snow hurricane” struck Massachusetts. The storm began with winds so powerful that whole forests were leveled. Houses, barns, chimneys, and church steeples came crashing down. Even when the wind subsided, it continued to snow. As much as two feet fell in some places. Fruit was blown off trees and potatoes froze in the ground. Hundreds of cattle, sheep, and poultry died. Ships at anchor collided with each other and nearby wharves, killing the men on board. So many oaks and pines were lost that it was decades before the state’s shipbuilding industry recovered. In some parts of Massachusetts, the storm changed the landscape so dramatically that people felt as though they were suddenly living in a new and unfamiliar place.

The storm that left such a profound mark on Massachusetts began on the evening of Tuesday, October 9, 1804, when the temperature plummeted and rain and snow began to fall, accompanied by thunder and lightning. During the night and next morning, the wind blew from the southeast, but by the afternoon of the 10th, the wind had shifted to the northeast and increased in intensity. As Sidney Perley recorded in his 1891 book on historic storms of New England, “the wind reached its height in the evening,. . . People sat up all that night, fearing to retire lest their houses would blow down. Wednesday morning [the 10th] revealed the streets in town encumbered with sections of fence, whole or parts of trees, and many other things that the wind could carry away; the town and county roads everywhere were obstructed with fallen trees.”

Just as the wind began to die down, it began to snow and snowed throughout Wednesday and into Thursday, with accumulations from five to 14 inches. In southern New England it melted in a few days, but further north it stayed on the ground until the following spring. It had been 50 years since the people of eastern Massachusetts had experienced such an early storm, and even the oldest inhabitants could not remember such a violent one.

Orchards were ruined when boughs, laden with ripe fruit, snapped under the weight of the snow. The woods resounded with the hideous noise of breaking tree limbs, dealing a severe blow to the region’s shipbuilders. Large numbers of cattle, sheep, and fowl were killed, especially in the Essex County towns of Newbury and Topsfield.

“Such great sections of woods were leveled that new landscapes and prospects were brought into view to the surprise of many people. Houses and other buildings and hills that could not be seen before from certain places were now plainly visible. The change was so great in some localities that the surroundings seemed to have become entirely different, and people felt as if they were in a strange place.”

“Buildings and chimneys were blown down or greatly damaged by the wind.” Many churches lost spires and steeples, including the famous North Church in Boston. Few barns, sheds, or chimneys escaped unscathed. Roofs were blown off, houses collapsed, and many people lost their lives. Streets were filled with the debris of destroyed buildings, fences, and trees.

The most damage, however, occurred to wharves and ships. “Many vessels in the harbors dragged their anchors or broke their cables, and dashed against each other or the wharves, or were driven upon lee-shores and wrecked.” Many seamen died as ships were run ashore or against reefs and sand bars. The sloop Hannah was blown out of Cape Ann harbor and struck a ledge off the shore of Cohasset, many miles to the south. The first wave that swept the deck carried off the crew with the exception of “two men who lashed themselves to the boom and remained on deck about two hours until the vessel went to pieces, when the boom with the men still lashed to it washed ashore. Several of the citizens of Cohasset saw the men plunging in the surf, and came to their assistance saving them when they were nearly exhausted.” The Hannah was one of five vessels wrecked on the shores of Cohasset during the storm.

Sources

Historic Storms of New England, by Sidney Perley (Commonwealth Editions, 2001, reprint of 1891 edition).

More…….

Sidney Perley recorded in his 1891 book on historic storms of New England, “the wind reached its height in the evening,. . . People sat up all that night, fearing to retire lest their houses would blow down. Wednesday morning [the 10th] revealed the streets in town encumbered with sections of fence, whole or parts of trees, and many other things that the wind could carry away; the town and county roads everywhere were obstructed with fallen trees.”

Just as the wind began to die down, it began to snow and snowed throughout Wednesday and into Thursday, with accumulations from five to 14 inches. In southern New England it melted in a few days, but further north it stayed on the ground until the following spring. It had been 50 years since the people of eastern Massachusetts had experienced such an early storm, and even the oldest inhabitants could not remember such a violent one.

Orchards were ruined when boughs, laden with ripe fruit, snapped under the weight of the snow. The woods resounded with the hideous noise of breaking tree limbs, dealing a severe blow to the region’s shipbuilders. Large numbers of cattle, sheep, and fowl were killed, especially in the Essex County towns of Newbury and Topsfield.

“Such great sections of woods were leveled that new landscapes and prospects were brought into view to the surprise of many people. Houses and other buildings and hills that could not be seen before from certain places were now plainly visible. The change was so great in some localities that the surroundings seemed to have become entirely different, and people felt as if they were in a strange place.”

“Buildings and chimneys were blown down or greatly damaged by the wind.” Many churches lost spires and steeples, including the famous North Church in Boston. Few barns, sheds, or chimneys escaped unscathed. Roofs were blown off, houses collapsed, and many people lost their lives. Streets were filled with the debris of destroyed buildings, fences, and trees.

The most damage, however, occurred to wharves and ships. “Many vessels in the harbors dragged their anchors or broke their cables, and dashed against each other or the wharves, or were driven upon lee-shores and wrecked.” Many seamen died as ships were run ashore or against reefs and sand bars. The sloop Hannah was blown out of Cape Ann harbor and struck a ledge off the shore of Cohasset, many miles to the south. The first wave that swept the deck carried off the crew with the exception of “two men who lashed themselves to the boom and remained on deck about two hours until the vessel went to pieces, when the boom with the men still lashed to it washed ashore. Several of the citizens of Cohasset saw the men plunging in the surf, and came to their assistance saving them when they were nearly exhausted.” The Hannah was one of five vessels wrecked on the shores of Cohasset during the storm.

 


Update

October 30th, 2012 at 10:07 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

A scattering of light showers continue to pivot through the area.  They have had trouble making much progress to the southwest due to dry air impinging from the west.  This will continue into tonight.  I would not rule out a few flakes/sleet mixing in with lows near 34.

It will still be blustery, but not like today.


Wind Gusts

October 30th, 2012 at 5:47 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

Measured gusts over past 30 minutes & peak gusts measured today:


Wind Decreasing a Bit This Evening-Tonight….Gust to 43 mph at WLFI at 4:19 p.m…………….Halloween Forecast

October 30th, 2012 at 3:16 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

A band of stronger winds with sporadic gusts to 45 mph is moving through right now.  After this, winds will decrease a bit, but it will still be a blustery night with sporadic stronger gusts.

Some scattered rain showers will continue to pivot through.  At the onset of the showers due to evaporative cooling (wet-bulbing).   Some snow/sleet may mix in again overnight.  Some snow/sleet has been reported at Logansport & Peru, so far today.  Chuck, northeast of Frankfort has reported all chilly rain & Doug has reported all chilly rain at Flora.

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Some Rain/Snow/Sleet Showers………Windy with Peak Gusts So Far to 49 mph In Northeast……40 mph WLFI-TV

October 30th, 2012 at 1:50 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

Winds have gusted as high as 49 mph in the viewing area today.  The highest wind gusts have been in our eastern counties.  Just outside of our viewing area, noticed 50 mph wind gust measured at the Starke County Airport.

Peru has gusted to 47 mph, Kokomo 46 mph, while the Howard County Airport recorded at gust of 45 mph.  Bunker Hill (Grissom ARB) has gusted to 44 mph.

Some rain, snow & sleet showers are pivoting in from the east around Superstorm Sandy.  Don’t be surprised to see some flakes/sleet today & tonight.  Today, the flakes/sleet with the rain will be caused by evaporative cooling through all of this dry air.  Tonight, colder temperatures at surface & upstairs will make for this with lows around 34.


Snow, Rain…..Power Outages In Indiana From “Superstorm Sandy” Winds……Second Highest Lake Michigan Waves On Record

October 30th, 2012 at 12:36 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

Damaging winds have been affecting Indiana today with gusts in our eastern counties to 49 mph.

Peak gust so far at WLFI 40 mph.

Going to keep potential of gusts to 50 mph into the mid-afternoon, then decrease the wind a bit in the evening, per recent data & model projections.

Waves on southern Lake Michigan have reached 20.3′, the second highest official reading on record.

Up to 4.5″ of snow has fallen in central Ohio.  Rain, snow & sleet will push westward with time today.  If there is any accumulation it will be light & brief.  So, count on a mix of rain, snow & sleet showers this afternoon-tonight in the area.  A lot of this is due to so much dry air for the rain to go through & evaporative cooling causing some snow/sleet mix as temperatures fall from 44 or 45 to 36 or 37.


Wind Gusts Today-Tonight & Current Wind Forecast For Our Area

October 29th, 2012 at 10:44 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog

Wind gusts of 45-50 mph are possible Tuesday 7 a.m. – 1 p.m., before decreasing to 30-40 mph in the afternoon. Sustained winds of 15-30 mph will occur.


NWS New York City LSR: New York Stock Exchange Trading Floor Under 3′ Water….4′ Under East River Subway Tunnels…….

October 29th, 2012 at 10:09 pm by under Chad's WLFI Weather Blog
PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW YORK NY
933 PM EDT MON OCT 29 2012

..TIME...   ...EVENT...      ...CITY LOCATION...     ...LAT.LON...
..DATE...   ....MAG....      ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
            ..REMARKS..

0927 PM     COASTAL FLOOD    MANHATTAN               40.78N  73.97W
10/29/2012                   NEW YORK           NY   BROADCAST MEDIA

            NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANCE TRADING FLOOR UNDER 3 FEET OF
            WATER.
0900 PM     COASTAL FLOOD    MANHATTAN               40.78N  73.97W
10/29/2012                   NEW YORK           NY   MTA

            4 FEET OF SEAWATER ENTERING SUBWAY TUNNELS UNDER EAST
            RIVER

Significant flooding continues over the coastal Northeast from the ocean & from heavy rainfall.  Flooding from the rainfall is increasing inland, while tremendous snowfall continues to occur from North Carolina to West Virginia & Virginia higher elevations.  Wet snow is mixing with rain in Ohio.

Winds have reportedly gusted to 113 mph at Babylon, New York, 94 mph in Suffolk County, New York. 90 mph Islip, New York & 79 mph at JFK Airport.

Battery Park storm surge record set in the great 1821 hurricane has been broken.  Most storm surge records are breaking.

This storm had a surface pressure to a Category 4, but was a Category 1.  However, it was sort of a hybrid of a Nor’Easter & hurricane (Superstorm) at landfall with a wall of water like a high end Category 4.

Meanwhile, it is now snowing at Columbus, Ohio & over 12″ of snow has fallen near Gatlinburg, Tennessee with up to 16″ of snowfall reported out of West Virginia.